Livingston International http://www.14shengzhi.com Simplify Trade Fri, 11 Oct 2019 22:37:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 MTB petitions for 2021 now being accepted by ITC http://www.14shengzhi.com/mtb-petitions-for-2021-now-being-accepted-by-itc/ Fri, 11 Oct 2019 22:36:31 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48605 October 11, 2019 – The International Trade Commission (ITC) announced they are accepting Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) petitions for the period beginning January 1, 2021. Petitions may be filed on the ITC’s Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Petition System (MTBPS) portal, beginning October 11, 2019, until 5:15 p.m. (EST) on December 10, 2019. MTBs temporarily reduce or... Read more »

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October 11, 2019 – The International Trade Commission (ITC) announced they are accepting Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) petitions for the period beginning January 1, 2021.

Petitions may be filed on the ITC’s Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Petition System (MTBPS) portal, beginning October 11, 2019, until 5:15 p.m. (EST) on December 10, 2019.

MTBs temporarily reduce or suspend the duty on imports of approved products, for a three-year period. Goods must be ‘non-controversial’ or ‘non-competitive’ products that are ‘revenue neutral’ (meaning not more than $500,000 in duty per year over three years).

Once petitions are filed, the ITC accepts public comments, then issue a report of those approved, for furtherance to the House Ways and Means Committee, and Senate Committee on Finance, who compile a MTB implementing the duty reductions and suspensions.

The timing of the process can be found on the ITC’s MTB webpage.
Training sessions are also available.

If you have any questions regarding the start of 2021 MTB petition submission process, Livingston can help! Please contact your Livingston account manager, or our U.S. Regulatory Affairs Group at usregaffairs@livingstonintl.com.

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CFIA Implementation of Guidelines for Importing Mixtures Containing Animal-Origin Ingredients http://www.14shengzhi.com/cfia-implementation-of-guidelines-for-importing-mixtures-containing-animal-origin-ingredients/ Fri, 11 Oct 2019 20:45:58 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48594 October 11, 2019 –?The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) issued a notice advising of changes to guidelines for importing products of animal origin containing multiple ingredients (Section 9 of the Terrestrial animal products and by-products: Import policy framework). These changes will be in effect as of November 1, 2019. These guidelines affect, for example, livestock... Read more »

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October 11, 2019 –?The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) issued a notice advising of changes to guidelines for importing products of animal origin containing multiple ingredients (Section 9 of the Terrestrial animal products and by-products: Import policy framework). These changes will be in effect as of November 1, 2019.

These guidelines affect, for example, livestock feeds and feed ingredients, fertilizers, medicinal products, mixtures used for the production of pet foods, food with milk or egg ingredients, vitamin and mineral supplements, and commodities containing products of a rendering plant or other animal-origin ingredients. The import requirement of these types of products will require an import permit issued by CFIA.

Details can be found in Section 9 of the Terrestrial animal products and by-products import policy framework.

What’s new

To help prevent the introduction of animal diseases into Canada, ingredient percentages will no longer be used to determine import conditions and the focus will be on disease risk. Therefore, import requirements may change and, in some cases, become more stringent.

What to do

If you import mixtures containing animal-origin ingredients, here’s what to do:

  • Review Section 9 (products of animal origin containing multiple ingredients) to determine whether it applies to your commodities
  • If you already have an import permit and need an amendment because of these changes, you only need to apply for the amendment before your next required permit renewal
    • For one year after the implementation date of November 1st, 2019, import permits may reflect either the previous or new guidelines
    • As permits are renewed during this transitional year, they will reflect the new guidelines
  • Please continue to use the Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) to identify import conditions.
    • If your commodity is not listed in AIRS, CFIA may apply Section 9 import requirements case by case
  • If you do not yet have an import permit or need to renew your permit, you must provide documentation listing all animal-origin ingredients in the commodity, as well as the species and the country of origin of each ingredient, to the Centre of Administration when applying for an import permit and to the National Import Service Centre when requesting clearance of a shipment.

Understanding the meat product exceptions under section 25 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations

Section 25 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) applies to meat products; imported meat products and meat products prepared within Canada. The meat products are grouped into 2 categories:

  1. Mixtures
    • A mixture is a food that contains ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products with other non-meat ingredients (for example, meat stew, tourtière, pepperoni pizza)
  2. Broth/animal fat/ meat flavor or extract
    • Broth, lard, leaf lard, tallow or other rendered fat, suet, shortening, flavor or extract

Mixtures and broths/animal fats/ meat flavors or extracts that meet the requirements of section 25 are exempt from SFCR requirements specific to the import of meat products and the work shift requirements, including the storing and handling of meat products in its imported condition for inspection. A comparison of how some of the SFCR requirements apply to meat products that fall under section 25 to all other meat products; whether imported and prepared in Canada are found in Table 1 and Table 2.

If you prepare meat products that fall into the two categories in section 25, you need a Safe Food for Canadians (SFC) licence and a written preventive control plan (PCP). Licence holders who are making an RTE meat product prior to mixing it with other non-meat ingredients do not qualify for the exception under section 25.

While section 25 meat products are exempt from certain SFCR requirements outlined in the tables above, when exporting, you must meet all requirements of the importing country to avoid affecting your eligibility and status on export eligibility lists. For more information export eligibility lists, consult the Export registers and lists.

Any questions or comments may be sent to cfia.apabpimport-importationpespa.acia@canada.ca.

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Why Washington Shouldn’t see Vietnam as the Next China http://www.14shengzhi.com/why-washington-shouldnt-see-vietnam-as-the-next-china/ Fri, 11 Oct 2019 19:42:23 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48584 This article was originally published in Global Trade Magazine on Oct. 8, 2019.? By Cora Di Pietro, Vice President, Global Trade Consulting In a recent Senate Finance Committee report, U.S. Trade Czar Robert Lighthizer opined that Vietnam must take action to curb its growing trade surplus with the U.S., including removing barriers to market access... Read more »

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This article was originally published in Global Trade Magazine on Oct. 8, 2019.?

Hanoi City SkylineBy Cora Di Pietro, Vice President, Global Trade Consulting

In a recent Senate Finance Committee report, U.S. Trade Czar Robert Lighthizer opined that Vietnam must take action to curb its growing trade surplus with the U.S., including removing barriers to market access for U.S. companies.

While it is true that?Vietnam’s?trade surplus has grown significantly in 2019, much of it is the result of the trade war between the U.S. and?China?that has prompted importers to source from Vietnam as an alternative to China.

Rather than attempt to stunt Vietnam’s trade surplus through?tariffs?or other trade actions, Washington should be establishing alliances with countries in Southeast Asia as part of its quest to ensure balanced trade and market stability.

Lighthizer’s comments were in response to queries from the Committee and echoed previous statements made by White House administration officials who have identified Vietnam as one of several countries to watch with respect to trade activity. And while there hasn’t been a direct threat of imposing tariffs on Vietnamese imports, the recent implementation of a 400% duty on Vietnamese steel imports and the recent rhetoric in Washington regarding transshipment has many businesses nervous that their new safe haven may be the President’s next target for trade action.

Troublesome to United State Trade Representative (USTR) is that the surplus thus far in 2019 is already more than 30% higher than it was at this time last year, making Vietnam the leading nation in terms of percentage increase of import value in 2019.

Hastening trade imbalance

Washington has been at least somewhat complicit in hastening Vietnam’s growing trade surplus. Since the U.S. began imposing tariffs on China-origin goods, many U.S. companies (and some Chinese companies) have been looking to shift production to neighboring markets in Asia. A recent poll of U.S. companies by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in China showed that more than 40% of American companies with production in China were looking to move to a neighboring country if they hadn’t already done so. These include the likes of Dell, HP, Steve Madden, Brooks and others. Even non-U.S. companies, like Japan’s Nintendo and China’s own electronics giant TCL are looking to shift production out of China and into Vietnam.

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CFIA Requirements on Food Containing Both Meat and Shellfish http://www.14shengzhi.com/cfia-requirements-on-food-containing-both-meat-and-shellfish/ Tue, 08 Oct 2019 18:55:27 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48551 Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) provides information of the new documents on the requirements that apply to the preparation of Fish products containing meat or Meat products containing shellfish and the import of Fish products containing meat or Meat products containing shellfish. Fish products containing meat If you import a fish product containing meat must... Read more »

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Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) provides information of the new documents on the requirements that apply to the preparation of Fish products containing meat or Meat products containing shellfish and the import of Fish products containing meat or Meat products containing shellfish.

Fish products containing meat
If you import a fish product containing meat must ensure that all the meat ingredients:

Note: The requirements specific to the import of meat products are outlined in the Overview?–?Importing meat products.

If your business manufactures, processes, treats, preserves, grades, packages or labels, for inter-provincial trade or export, a fish product and uses a meat product as an ingredient, must ensure that the meat was:

  • manufactured, processed, treated, preserved, graded, packaged or labelled in Canada by a person with a Safe Food for Canadians (SFC licence) to conduct those activities, or
  • imported by an SFC licence holder in accordance to the requirements outlined in the Overview?–?Importing meat products.

A person who processes (such as debones, cooks or cures) the meat ingredients they use in their fish product must have a work shift agreement.

Meat products containing shellfish
If you import a meat product containing raw shellfish (excluding the adductor muscles of scallops or the meat of geoduck) you must ensure that the shellfish originate from a country with a shellfish inspection system recognized by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency under Part 7 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR).

If your business manufactures, processes, treats, preserves, grades, packages or labels, for inter-provincial trade or export, a meat product and uses raw shellfish (excluding the adductor muscles of scallops or the meat of geoduck) as an ingredient, must ensure that the shellfish:

  • were harvested in an area classified under the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program
  • are not subject to an order prohibiting fishing issued under the Management of Contaminated Fisheries Regulations (MCFR) or were decontaminated in accordance with the decontamination plan submitted in connection with a licence to fish for food purposes issued under the MCFR, or
  • were imported by a Safe Food for Canadians licence (SFC licence) holder and originate from a country with a shellfish inspection system recognized by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency under Part 7 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR).

More Information on the requirements:

If you have any further questions or inquiries you can contact CFIA directly at 1-800-442-2342 or you can submit it electronically by filling out the contact form.

 

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Government of Canada Initiates SIMA Inquiry on Sucker Rods from Argentina, Brazil and Mexico http://www.14shengzhi.com/government-of-canada-initiates-sima-inquiry-on-sucker-rods-from-argentina-brazil-and-mexico/ Mon, 07 Oct 2019 18:29:39 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48538 October 7, 2019 – On September 30, 2019, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) announced that it has launched an investigation under the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA) respecting the alleged injurious dumping of certain sucker rods originating in or exported from Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. The investigation follows a complaint filed by Apergy Canada... Read more »

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October 7, 2019 – On September 30, 2019, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) announced that it has launched an investigation under the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA) respecting the alleged injurious dumping of certain sucker rods originating in or exported from Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico.

The investigation follows a complaint filed by Apergy Canada ULC – Alberta Oil Tool Division.

Subsequently, on October 1, 2019, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (CITT) gave notice that it has initiated an injury inquiry to determine if the alleged dumping of the subject sucker rods has caused injury or retardation or is threatening to cause injury to Canadian manufacturers.

The subject goods are described as sucker rods, including pony rods, with or without couplings attached and with or without guides attached, manufactured to American Petroleum Institute (API) 11B specifications, equivalent standards or proprietary standards, including in a finished or semi-finished state, made of solid steel, including carbon, alloy and special grades of steel, of 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) or less in diameter of rod body, with stated measurements subject to permissible tolerances.

Sucker Rods are usually classified under HS classification number 8413.91.00.10. However, classification numbers are for ease of reference only. Refer to the product definition for the authoritative details regarding the subject goods.

Parties wishing to participate in the preliminary injury inquiry must file a notice of participation with the CITT on or before October 15, 2019.

Written submissions & requests for information should be sent to:

The Registrar, Secretariat to the Canadian International Trade Tribunal
15th Floor, 333 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G7
Telephone: 613-993-3595
E-mail: citt-tcce@tribunal.gc.ca

Additional Information on the injury inquiry including specific details and a preliminary inquiry schedule, is found in the CITT Notice of Preliminary Injury Inquiry.?

Questions concerning the initial CBSA investigation should be directed to the following CBSA officers:

Andrew Manera: 613-946-2052
Khatira Akbari: 613-952-0532

More information on the investigation can be found in CBSA’s Notice of Initiation of Investigation.

A Statement of Reasons will be available within 15 days on the CBSA’s website.

Please contact your Livingston account representative should you have any questions.

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Section 301 Duties to Go into Effect for European Origin Products http://www.14shengzhi.com/section-301-duties-to-go-into-effect-for-european-origin-products/ Mon, 07 Oct 2019 14:03:09 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48528 [Updated October 09, 2019] October 7, 2019 – The U.S. will impose Section 301 duties on European Union (EU origin) products effective October 18, 2019. The U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced that arbitration by the World Trade Organization (WTO), in the dispute on subsidies provided by the European Union (EU) to Airbus, awarded an annual... Read more »

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[Updated October 09, 2019]

October 7, 2019 – The U.S. will impose Section 301 duties on European Union (EU origin) products effective October 18, 2019.

The U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced that arbitration by the World Trade Organization (WTO), in the dispute on subsidies provided by the European Union (EU) to Airbus, awarded an annual collection of up $7.5 billion. The U.S. will use additional Section 301 duties as their means of countermeasure.

The final product list includes 10 percent additional duty on imports of new airplanes and other aircraft [of Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) 8802.40.00] which are made in France, Germany, Spain, or the United Kingdom.

Other products, will incur a 25% additional duty rate, and will depend on the country of origin, and HTS, to determine whether affected.

If you have any questions regarding Section 301 duties on imports of EU origin products, Livingston can help!? Please contact either your Livingston account manager or our regulatory affairs group at usregaffairs@livingstonintl.com

 

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Date Extended for the Decommissioning of OGD Service Options PARS & RMD http://www.14shengzhi.com/date-extended-for-the-decommissioning-of-ogd-service-options-pars-rmd/ Fri, 04 Oct 2019 16:40:18 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48512 October 4, 2019 – Due to the delay in issuing the Single Window Initiative (SWI), Integrated Import Declaration (IID) ECCRD Addendum, the deadline to sunset the legacy Other Government Department (OGD) release service options (OGD PARS and OGD RMD) will be extended to April 1, 2020. The SWI IID ECCRD Addendum includes the necessary functionality... Read more »

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October 4, 2019 – Due to the delay in issuing the Single Window Initiative (SWI), Integrated Import Declaration (IID) ECCRD Addendum, the deadline to sunset the legacy Other Government Department (OGD) release service options (OGD PARS and OGD RMD) will be extended to April 1, 2020. The SWI IID ECCRD Addendum includes the necessary functionality that will enable trade chain partners (TCPs) to process co-regulated shipments and, consequently, decommissioning cannot occur until this functionality has been implemented.

The Canada Border Services Agency encourages Trade Chain Partners (TCPs) to continue to transition release requests from the legacy OGD release service options to the SWI IID.

For information about the EDI registration/certification process, contact the CBSA’s TCCU, at TCCU-USTCC@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca.

For information about the Single Window Initiative (SWI), contact the SWI Generic Mailbox, at swi-igu@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca. or visit CBSA’s SWI webpage.

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TRQ Quota Products of Natural Milk Constituents Quantities available for reallocation http://www.14shengzhi.com/trq-quota-products-of-natural-milk-constituents-quantities-available-for-reallocation/ Fri, 04 Oct 2019 15:21:14 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48508 October 4, 2019 – Global Affairs Canada advises that as of September 18, 2019, quantities are available under the WTO products of natural milk constituents TRQ for 2019, including for allocations to import other products of natural milk constituents (e.g. blends of natural milk constituents). Available quantities of TRQ will be allocated to eligible applicants... Read more »

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October 4, 2019 – Global Affairs Canada advises that as of September 18, 2019, quantities are available under the WTO products of natural milk constituents TRQ for 2019, including for allocations to import other products of natural milk constituents (e.g. blends of natural milk constituents).

Available quantities of TRQ will be allocated to eligible applicants who demonstrate a requirement for products of natural milk constituents (including for other products of natural milk constituents such as blends) in their manufacturing operations and product formulations as per the allocation method detailed in Section 4 of Notice to Importers No. 891.

Those interested in securing an allocation are to provide the protein content and butterfat content of the product to be imported. Information for each finished product that will be manufactured with imported products of natural milk constituents, such as product name, description and the ratio (percentage) of imported products of natural milk constituents, is also to be provided to Global Affairs Canada.

If the cumulative requests made by eligible applicants exceed the quantity available, the quantity allocated to each eligible applicant will be the lower of the quantity requested or an equal share.

As of September 18, 2019, a total of 1,430,369 kg of TRQ are available for allocation for products of natural milk constituents until December 31, 2019.

Those interested in securing an allocation for products of natural milk constituents are to submit their request by email to dairy-laitier@international.gc.ca by close of business October 2, 2019.

If you have any questions, please contact dairy-laitier@international.gc.ca

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Simplification of Documents and Information Related to TRQ Administration for Supply-Managed Products http://www.14shengzhi.com/simplification-of-documents-and-information-related-to-trq-administration-for-supply-managed-products/ Fri, 04 Oct 2019 15:02:16 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48504 October 4, 2019 – Global Affairs Canada (GAC) recently issued a notice to industry to advise on the TRQ administration change for supply managed quota goods to streamline the notices into one document and one location for all the key dates, quantity and application timeline. In the light of the increased number of Tariff Rate... Read more »

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October 4, 2019 – Global Affairs Canada (GAC) recently issued a notice to industry to advise on the TRQ administration change for supply managed quota goods to streamline the notices into one document and one location for all the key dates, quantity and application timeline.

In the light of the increased number of Tariff Rate Quotas (TRQs), the Supply-Managed Trade Controls Division of Global Affairs Canada has undertaken an initiative to streamline and simplify public documents related to TRQ administration for supply-managed products. GAC would like to inform you that these documents are now available on our website in preparation for the application period starting October 1st.

The Notices to Importers have been reformulated in plain language. There is no change to existing ministerial policies. In order to eliminate information duplicated across many of the Notices to Importers, general information has been centralized in one document. Finally, one document that sets out key dates and access quantities for the various TRQs has been created to facilitate the updating and consultation of this information. These documents can be consulted at:

If you have any questions, you can reach Global Affairs by specific import control industry here.

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United States and Japan Reach Trade Agreement http://www.14shengzhi.com/united-states-and-japan-reach-trade-agreement/ Fri, 04 Oct 2019 14:50:03 +0000 http://www.14shengzhi.com/?p=48502 October 4, 2019 – The United States and Japan have reached an agreement regarding negotiations in market access for certain agriculture and industrial goods, as well as digital trade. 90 percent of U.S. food and agricultural products imported into Japan will either be duty free or receive preferential tariff access.? Under the agreement, Japan will:... Read more »

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October 4, 2019 – The United States and Japan have reached an agreement regarding negotiations in market access for certain agriculture and industrial goods, as well as digital trade.

90 percent of U.S. food and agricultural products imported into Japan will either be duty free or receive preferential tariff access.? Under the agreement, Japan will:

  • Reduce tariffs on products such as fresh and frozen beef and pork.
  • Provide a country-specific quota for wheat and wheat products.
  • Reduce the mark-up on imported U.S. wheat and barley.
  • Eliminate tariffs for almonds, walnuts, blueberries, cranberries, sweet corn, grain sorghum, broccoli, and more.
  • Provide staged tariff elimination for products such as cheeses, processed pork, poultry, beef offal, ethanol, wine, frozen potatoes, oranges, fresh cherries, egg products, and tomato paste.

A separate agreement was reached addressing areas of digital trade which include:

  • Prohibitions on imposing customs duties on digital products transmitted electronically.
  • Ensuring non-discriminatory treatment of digital products.
  • Ensuring barrier-free cross-border data transfers in all sectors.
  • Prohibit data localization requirements.
  • Prohibit arbitrary access to computer source code and algorithms.
  • Ensure firms’ flexibility to use innovative encryption technology in their products.

The United States looks forward to further negotiations with Japan for a comprehensive agreement that addresses any remaining tariff and non-tariff barriers to achieve fairer, more balanced trade.

If you have any questions regarding the US – Japan Trade Agreement, Livingston can help!? Please contact either your Livingston account manager or our regulatory affairs group at usregaffairs@livingstonintl.com

 

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